RV There Yet?: Camping in L.A.

By Madison McCann

Everyone can use a little break from the hustle and bustle of life in Los Angeles, but devoting a whole weekend away can be tough. If you feel the call of the wild but are stuck in the concrete jungle, escape to one of our favorite camping places in L.A. and get back to your roots.


If the Mountains Are Calling:

 Photo by Hollyanne Faber from Hipcamper.com

Photo by Hollyanne Faber from Hipcamper.com

Buckhorn Campground in the Angeles National Forest is something totally different from camping by the beach. The campsites, which sit at 6,300 feet elevation, are usually closed during the winter. In the summer, however, the warm weather brings out the best in Buckhorn. The campground is first come, first serve, and can fill up fast in the summer. There are 38 spots going for only $12 a night.


You Want That Hike and a Camping Spot With a View:

 Photo courtesy of TripAdvisor.com

Photo courtesy of TripAdvisor.com

Malibu Creek State Park provides views of the ocean from some sites, California golden poppies from others and hiking trails that could fill your whole day. The name comes from a natural creek that runs through the park into a swimming hole. Seeing deer while staying here is not unusual, so be sure to bring a camera. Some scenes from the TV show MASH were filmed here as well, so camping and tourism go hand in hand. Totally Insta-worthy!

 

*Malibu Creek currently has their campgrounds closed due to an ongoing police investigation. Make sure to check out their website for updated details on when they will open again before making a trip to the park.


The Journey to the Campsite Is Part of the Fun:

 Photo courtesy of CaliforniaBeaches.com

Photo courtesy of CaliforniaBeaches.com

Little Harbor Campground on Catalina Island is arguably the best camping spot near L.A. To get there, you have to take a ferry ride from the Port of Long Beach, then kayak or boat in. Tickets run anywhere from $60 to $75 per person, but the price is worth it. The campground sits on the very tip of the island, with extensive ocean views and boulders jutting out of the water. The island has plenty to experience, including small-city vibes in Avalon, seclusion at the campsite, and cultural influences in the Catalina Island Museum. Spend a day hiking to Descanso Beach Club, and then head back to your campsite for smores and a beautiful sunset.