Transfer Students: Here's What you Need to Know

By Jade Inglada

It’s not always easy being a transfer student. You put in a lot of time at community college (or another university) and find yourself on a new campus that may be vastly different from your previous school. Attending a university with almost 40,000 students can feel overwhelming to the point where you’re not sure where to begin. What should I be doing? What should I avoid? But don’t worry. Here are a few things that transfer students should know while starting their journey at The Beach.


DON'T PUT OFF THE GPE

You’ve already been accepted to CSULB, so you might as well get the GWAR Placement Exam done as soon as possible. The sooner you get this mandatory writing exam out of the way, the less of a hassle you’ll have registering for any writing intensive courses. If you haven’t already taken it during the summer, there’s still time to register for the test during the fall.

Befriend other students in your major

Even if you already know people on campus, it is worth getting to know other students in your department. You will end up seeing familiar faces in the upcoming semesters, so reach out and get to know your classmates. You never know what lasting friendships you may end up making.

Join a club

If you have trouble reaching out to other students, joining a club or campus organization is an easy way to connect with other people, no matter what department they are in. Week of Welcome is a great way to see what activities are available, ranging from professional or academic clubs to sports. With so many options to choose from, you are sure to find your people.

GO TO OFFICE HOURS

You might have avoided going to your professor’s advising hours at your previous school, but taking time to meet with them is a good habit to develop. More often than not, you will have certain faculty for more than one class. If you find a favorite professor, go to them for help and build a relationship. If you are thinking about grad school, you will have people to reach out to for guidance (or letters of recommendation).

SEE A COUNSELOR (NO, SERIOUSLY)

This is a definite must. Do not put off visiting a counselor, whether it is one in your department or your college. Being at a university has quite a few differences compared to a place like community college (capstones, anyone?), so it’s important to meet with someone. Counselors can help make sure you are on the right track and taking the right classes to graduate.

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