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BY: MATT GRIPPI

Movies

Sept. 14 | "Finding Nemo 3D"

Of all of Disney’s cash-grab 3D rereleases of old films, this is the only one that actually makes sense. Andrew Stanton’s 2003 Pixar film was a visually spectacular masterpiece when it was released, and the underwater wonderland that they were able to create is bound to look spectacular in 3D. Animated films are one of the few mediums that have been able to use 3Deffectively, and this classic may be worth the double-dip to see again.

Sept. 14 | "The Master"

Paul Thomas Anderson hasn't released a film since 2007's award-winning "There Will Be Blood." However, his next film "The Master" sounds like it is worth the long wait. Starring Phillip Seymour Hoffman as an intellectual novelist who starts a Scientology-like religious cult after World War II. His young protege is a psychologically scarred former soldier and drifter played by Joaquin Phoenix. It should be interesting to see Phoenix in a legitimate role after his quasi-fake meltdown in 2008. Jonny Greenwood, the guitarist for British rock band Radiohead, will be providing the soundtrack.

 

Music

Menomena | "Moms"

Menomena is a two piece psychedelic indie rock band from Portland Oregon that has been around since 2000. Their dense instrumentation and constant variation in musical style and image has made them one of the most interesting indie bands to watch over the years. Art has always been a huge aspect of their appeal. Their first album “I Am the Fun Blame Monster!” was packaged in an elaborate 80-page flipbookcreated by the band members themselves. Their second album “Under an Hour” was entirely instrumental and served as the soundtrack to an experimental traveling dance troupe called Monster Squad. They also have some absolutely insane music videos, most notably the video for “Evil Bee” which focuses on an animated bee in a honey factory being mistreated by his robot crow bosses. It should be interesting to see where the band goes with their new album “Moms” which is due out this month.

 

Television

Sept. 16 | Boardwalk Empire (HBO)

Last season of Boardwalk Empire ended with a literal “bang” which left many viewers questioning what direction the show could possibly proceed from here. The third season of the Prohibition-era drama looks as if the violence and betrayal has only just begun. NuckyThompson, played by the always fantastic Steve Buscemi, has transformed over the past few seasons from a corrupt politician to a ruthless gangster. Fans of Martin Scorcesegangster films and stories of how power corrupts the human soul are bound to enjoy this series.

 

Events

Sept. 7 | "Star Dreck"  | Nerdmelt Theater. 7522 Sunset Blvd. LA, CA, 90046

On Sunset Blvd. in Los Angeles there is an awesome comic book store called Meltdown Comics which hides one of LA’s best-kept secrets. In the back room of the store there is a comedy club called the Nerdmelt which hosts cheap comedy shows almost nightly. One of the highlights of their monthly schedule is “StarDreck,” a show in which comedians KumailNanjiani and Matt Mira watch old terrible episodes of Star Treck: The Next Generation and make fun of their appalling cheesiness. Whether you’re a fan of Star Treck or not, this show is absolutely hilarious and often has exciting guest stars. Past guests have included Thomas Lennon (Reno 911) and Paul Scheer (The League.) Definitely worth the $8 admission fee. Tickets can be purchased at nerdmeltla.com

 

Art

Exit Through the Gift Shop

Since this is the Art issue, it seems like a perfect time to recommend Exit Through the Gift Shop, an Academy  Award nominated documentary about the street artist Banksy. The film is like no documentary you’ve ever seen before, and questions the human fascination with art and what effect it has on the industry itself. The title is a reference to the fact that after an amazing adventure on a Disneyland ride, you always “exit through the gift shop” and the adventure fades away to reveal that it was all just a ploy to make money. At what point does an artist’s work just become a product for sale, and when that happens is it still art? This film attempts to answer that question or at least force the viewer to think about it.